Pinnacle Classical Academy
Classical and Christian Education in Little Rock, Arkansas

Classical Christian Education

Why Christian?

The Board of Directors of Pinnacle Classical Academy and all of its faculty believe that the God of the Bible is the source of all truth and knowledge. We believe that He created the entire Universe out of nothing and that He alone has existed throughout all eternity. Acts 17:28 states, “For in Him we live and move and have our being.” Moreover, the apostle Paul writes in Colossians 1:16-17, “For by [Jesus Christ] all things were created: things in heaven and on Earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.”

Subsequent to these beliefs, PCA understands all knowledge to be rooted in the person of Jesus Christ. He Himself is the embodiment of Truth. We therefore strive to teach all knowledge as an integrated whole, united and centered in Jesus Christ as He is revealed in the Bible. No subject is purely “secular” or separated from the truth of God and the truth of the Scriptures. All subjects must correlate to each and every other subject because all flow from the same source, the one true God. As a Christ-centered school, PCA seeks to teach students in such a way that they will see how math, science, English, Latin and even history and art all interrelate and affect one another. The students will also be led to consider what these subjects teach us about the very person and nature of God.

 

Why Classical?

The classical model of learning provides a fitting complement to this Biblical view of knowledge. Beginning in classical Greece and Rome and continuing through the Middle Ages, scholars realized that the pursuit of truth required a unified view of the world and of knowledge. Subjects were not taught in isolation. Indeed, the very purpose of education was not to master a particular body of knowledge. Rather it was to acquire universal tools of learning so that the student would be equipped for a lifelong journey of acquiring knowledge, no matter what the subject matter. The well-trained mind could then apply itself to any area of study but especially to the deep questions of the nature of God and eternal Truth. It was for this reason that they referred to theology as ‘Queen of the Sciences,’ the pinnacle they sought to ascend through all of their previous intellectual effort.

Modern classical education emphasizes the accomplishments of the great Western civilizations, their literature and art, and all of the elements that have been tested, tried and found true for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. The modern student is aided in these studies through learning the classical languages Latin and Greek. But it is the tools of learning, the Seven Liberal Arts contained in the Trivium and the Quadrivium, that are the real great heritage that modern classical education seeks most fully to revive. To quote Dorothy Sayers, “the tools of learning are the same, in any and every subject; and the person who knows how to use them will, at any age, get the mastery of a new subject in half the time and with a quarter of the effort expended by the person who has not the tools at his command. . .to have learned and remembered the art of learning makes the approach to every subject an open door.”

 

Putting It Together

Classical Christian education capitalizes upon the methodology of the ancients but with a distinct advantage: namely that the selfsame Truth they sought has already been revealed in the person of Jesus Christ. We are not searching to discover Truth anew. Rather, we train our minds to learn more about the person and character of God that we might grow in our relationship with the One who is Truth Himself, giving Christ glory. It is a task that will engage us in every aspect of our being if we engage in it fully. It encompasses any and every worthy form of knowledge and expression. Indeed, it is a foretaste of Heaven itself, recognizing that now we “see in a mirror, dimly, but then face to face. Now [we] know in part, but then [we] shall know just as [we] also [are] known” (I Corinthians 13:12).

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